University of Tokyo

Abstract
Survey Number 0191
Survey Title National Family Research of Japan 1998 (NFRJ98), 1999
Depositor The National Family Research Committee of the Japan Society of Family Sociology
(Former Name:National Family Research of Japan, Japanese Society of Family Sociology)
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Educational Purpose Available for both research and instructional purposes.
Period of Data Use Permission One year
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Summary The plans of NFR (National Family Research) developed as the Family Sociology Seminar dissolved and developed into Japanese Society of Family Sociology. The actual research is conducted by the National Family Research Committee of the Japanese Society of Family Sociology, however, the management is taken care of by National Family Research Working Group, which was formed by those members of the Society who are interested in the Research, and its executives. The goals of the NFR are to provide data which would be conducive to the promotion of family research, and to contribute to the creation of new knowledge. More specifically, its goals are to collect high-quality and reliable data, which explain the socio-cultural and demographic trend of contemporary Japanese families, to jointly utilize the data collected, and to continuously increase the collection of data sets. Contemporary Japanese society is going through an extremely speedy transition, which is closely tied to the changes in the social situation of the world, and family is no exception in this trend. By recognizing the context in which this survey came to be conducted, NFR Working Group tries to write and explain how individuals view their family in this transitional period for families, the changes in the life events families go through, and the chronological change in the family as a group perceived by an individual of the family. This survey was conducted in 1999 following the pre-survey. Future surveys are to be conducted every 5 or 10 years.
Universe Men and women from age 28 to 77 as of December 1998
Unit of Observation Individual
Sample Size 10,500 samples, 6,985 effective responses (66.52%)
Time Period January-February 1999
Spatial Unit All over Japan (110 locations in 13 cities, 200 locations in cities with more than 100,000 people, 102 locations in cities with less than 100,000 people, 123 locations in towns and villages, total 535 locations.)
Sampling Procedure Multiple stage random sampling. Every few persons were sampled at given locations from residents' registry (502 locations) or voters' registry (33 locations).
Mode of Data Collection Placement (self-administered) method
Investigator National Family Research Working Group, Japanese Society of Family Sociology; Field survey was conducted by Central Research Services, Inc.
Sponsors (Funds) Ministry of Education Research Fund
Related Publications (by the Investigator) "Nihon Gendai Kazoku no Kisoteki Kenkyu---Heisei 10 - 12nendo Kagaku Kenkyuhi Hojokin (Kiban Kenkyu A) Kenkyu Seika Hokokusho (1) [Basic Research on Contemporary Families in Japan]" July 2000 Japan Society of Family Sociology
" Kazoku Seikatu nituiteno Zenkokuchosa (NFR98) Hokokusho [Report on Nationwide Survey on Family lives]" July 2000 National Family Research Working Group (ed)
Related Publications (based on Secondary Analysis) List of related publications (based on Secondary Analysis)
Documentation [Chosa-hyo]
Major Survey Items There are two survey sheets: One is the general survey sheet, which do not include question 11, and the other is a survey sheet for senior citizens who are between 58 to 77 years of age.

1) Information about the respondent: sex; date of birth, age; place of birth; last school attended, year of graduation; last school the respondent's father attended; respondent's father's occupation when the respondent was 15 years of age; experience of living away from your family, for how long?; occupation (position, type of job, size of the employer, number of work days, working hours, hours to commute); first job (month/year you got the job, position, type of job, size of the employer).

2) Information about the household: annual income, number of household members, composition of the household members, head of the household, type of residence, annual income of the household.

3) Information about the spouse and husband/wife relationship: marital status, month/year of marriage; whether the respondent's spouse changed his/her family name upon marriage; date of birth, age; last school attended; occupation (position, type of job, size of the employer, number of work days, working hours, hours to commute); annual income; health conditions; responsibilities (cooking dinner, shopping); division of labor among the couple (fixing meal, laundry, cleaning the bathtub, caring for the children, caring for the sick and aged family); support the couple give each other (talking about things you are worried about, giving credits to what your spouse has accomplished, giving advice); power balance between the husband and the wife; satisfaction in the marriage (the way household work is divided, relationship with your children, management of the family budget, sex life, marriage life in general, whether you perceive him/her as your family).

4) Respondent's experience of being married: experience of divorce, separation or separation by the spouse's death; month/year you were first married; month/year your spouse departed; leaving the workforce because of marriage, experience of changing jobs; leaving the workforce because of child birth, experience of changing jobs.

5) Respondent's life: norms of the family (division of labor based on expected sex roles, love of the husband and wife, sexual relationship of the unmarried, self-sacrifice of the parents, obligation of the first son, living with the aged parents); stressful issues in the family (things about your children/spouse/ parents and parents in law that you are worried about, sense of loneliness in the family, pressure of the role you ought to play in the family/on your job, sense of loneliness in the workplace, health condition of the respondent); level of stress (16items)

6) Information about the children and your relationship with your children: number of children; sex; date of birth; whether your children are sound or whether any of them have departed; marriage of your first child (month/year, identify son/daughter); number of children who are healthy; relationship with your children (relationship with each child, whether your children live together with you or not, place of residence; family name of the children; frequency of communication; last school attended; employment status; marital status; the condition of the relationship; whether you perceive him/her as your family); activities you do with your children (dinner, hobby, sports, games, going out, teaching or helping them with their work)

7) Information about the parents and your relationship with your parents: date of birth/death of your parents; relationship with your parents (with your father, with your mother, whether you are adopted or not, employment status, whether you live with them or not, place of residence, frequency of communication, marital status, whether you perceive him/her as your family).

8) Information about the siblings and your relationship with your siblings: number of siblings; relationship with your siblings (sex, date of birth, family name, whether you live with them or not, frequency of communication, marital status, whether you perceive him/her as your family).

9) Information about the parents-in-law and your relationship with your parents-in-law: date of birth/death of your parents-in-law, relationship with your parents-in-law (with your father-in-law, with your mother-in-law, employment status, whether they live with you or not, place of residence, frequency of communication, condition of the relationship, whether you perceive him/her as your family).

10) Information about your relatives and your relationship with your relatives: experience of giving financial support over the past year (support provided to children above age 18, parents, siblings, parents-in-law); experience of having troubles and conflicts over the past year (with your spouse, children above age 18, parents, siblings, parents-in-law); source of support other than relatives (when you have problems or things you want to talk about to other people, in case of urgent money need, in time of sickness and accident, when you become disabled); number of other relatives and whether you perceive them as your family (grand parents, uncles and aunts, nephews and nieces, spouses of your children, grand children, spouses of your siblings; siblings of your spouse); age of your first grand child.

11) Experience of nursing and caring for the family (to senior citizens only): experience of nursing and caring for your father/mother/father-in-law/mother-in-law (how serious, length of the experience, kind of care you provided, whether the nursing demanded you to change your residence and job); your spouse's experience of nursing and caring for the family (how serious, length of the experience, kind of care you provided, whether the nursing demanded you to change your residence and job length of the experience, kind of care you provided, whether the nursing demanded you to change your residence and job).
Date of Release 2001/06/14
Version National Family Research Working Group, Japanese Society of Family Sociology
Registered on June 14, 2001
Topics Society/Culture
Notes for Users Data Sets are written in Japanese.